Sustainability in Food

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Food security spotlight shines on Canberra, Australia

Some of the Australia’s most respected food security experts will participate in a special forum, on Tues., March 11, in Canberra. The panel is gathered to discuss new research findings in the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) report, Feeding Asia Pacific: Australia’s role in regional food security.

The forum, hosted by Rik L Miller, DuPont Crop Protection president, is the latest in a serious of global food security spotlight events, which have taken place around the world since the launch of the EIU’s Global Food Security Index, sponsored exclusively by DuPont.

Since 2012, DuPont has been bringing people together from around the globe to talk about the critically important challenge of food security – from Washington DC to Chile, Johannesburg to Brussels, Sao Paolo to Mexico and Singapore to New Delhi.

DuPont is proud to bring that discussion to Canberra, Australia, to examine the significant role Australia plays in helping meet the food needs of a rapidly growing Asia Pacific region.

 

dupontAUweb_smlOn the panel:

Be a part of this event. Visit dupont.com.au to learn more about the event or follow us on Twitter @DuPontAusNews and join the conversation using #asiafoodbowl,

The forum will be broadcast live on the Australian Public Affairs Channel and the Australia Broadcasting Corporation’s national news channel ABC2. The broadcast can be viewed via a livestream on their website, www.apac.tv.

A download on demand webcast will be available shortly after the event. We will share website details when they are available.

Driving the Agricultural Development of Southeast Mexico

A ribbon cutting ceremony was held at the DuPont Pioneer seed research center in Chiapas State, Mexico. From the left, Fernando González, sr. research manager of DuPont Pioneer Latin America North; Luis Rebollar, president of DuPont Mexico, Central America and Caribbean and Ricardo García de Alba, Business Director of DuPont Pioneer Latin America North.

A ribbon cutting ceremony was held at the DuPont Pioneer seed research center in Chiapas State, Mexico. From the left, Fernando González, sr. research manager of DuPont Pioneer Latin America North; Luis Rebollar, president of DuPont Mexico, Central America and Caribbean and Ricardo García de Alba, Business Director of DuPont Pioneer Latin America North.

Recently, DuPont Pioneer opened a unique research center in Chiapas State, Mexico. This is the first center of its kind in the region focused on increasing agricultural production, developing hybrid maize seeds for 12 countries with tropical climates similar to Mexico, such as Colombia, Venezuela and Central America.

During the event, Luis Rebollar, president of DuPont Mexico, Central America and Caribbean, explained that food security is a global challenge that DuPont is using its scientific capabilities to address. With the center, Pioneer is seeking solutions to the specific needs of unique agricultural environments not only in Mexico, but worldwide.

In his remarks, Ricardo García de Alba, Pioneer Latin America North director, also highlighted the importance of food security.  Adding that the development of hybrid seeds will help increase productivity in maize in the future, further focusing a commitment to provide food security to more than 100 million Mexicans.

Op-Ed: Trade pacts are tonic for the economy

An op-ed by former US Senator Tom Daschle, appeared in The Hill, on Feb. 20, 2014. Sen Daschle is a member of the DuPont Advisory Committee on Agricultural Innovation & Productivity . A portion of that op-ed follows; find the full post online.

A new debate is emerging regarding the economic impact of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and trade promotion authority (TPA) — that is, presidential “fast-track” power — on middle and lower income Americans. Opponents have argued that these trade measures will only exacerbate our country’s growing income inequality. They assert, therefore, that the president must be forced to choose between these two critical administration priorities.

But it is a false choice.

Inequality reflects a number of factors, including technological advancements that have increased productivity. The reality is that little of this has to do with trade agreements.

Read more on The Hill

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