Sustainability in Food

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Achieving a Food and Nutrition Secure World

Jo Luck, 2010 World Food Prize Laureate, former President of Heifer International and member of the DuPont Advisory Committee on Agricultural Innovation and Productivity, has dedicated her career to ensuring global food security by advocating for smallholder farmers and empowering women. On October 14, the eve of International Day for Rural Women and the opening of the 2014 Borlaug Dialogue, she penned an opinion piece for the Des Moines Register, Empowering Women to Feed the World. In it she discusses the importance of embracing and nurturing the potential of women smallholder farmers in the challenge of food and nutrition security.

Through access to tools, extension services, land and capital, women can transform the world’s ability to sustainably feed the planet and tackle the full spectrum of malnutrition, which is affecting the lives of so many of our children.
~ Jo Luck

Read the full article here.

 

PaulSchickler_WFPPublic Private Partnerships Discussed at Borlaug Dialogue

At day two of the 2014 Borlaug Dialogue, DuPont Pioneer President, Paul Schickler participated in a panel discussion, Focus on Africa, Policy and Partnerships.

A dynamic discussion followed brief remarks by Birtukan Dagnachew, a smallholder farmer from Ethiopia. Public-private-partnerships was a consistent theme of the panel.

In his remarks, Schickler emphasized education, partnerships and investment to promote agricultural productivity and development in Africa.

When asked about DuPont Pioneer partnerships and efforts in the region, he highlighted the Advanced Maize Seed Adoption Program (AMSAP), a collaboration with the government of Ethiopia and USAID to advance the agricultural development and food security goals set by the government of Ethiopia; a project with the National 4-H Council to strengthen youth development in rural African communities; and the establishment of a research hub in Delmas, South Africa for advanced seed breeding.

Schickler further emphasized that collaboration with smallholder farmers is crucial to improve agriculture productivity and livelihoods, saying that Pioneer can learn as much from local communities as people can learn from Pioneer in terms in global science and technology.

Joining Schickler on the panel were,

  • Moderator: Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda, CEO and Head of Mission, FANRPAN, Moderator
  • Birtukan Dagnachew, Smallholder farmer, Ethiopia
  • Florence Chenoweth, Minister of Agriculture, Liberia
  • Gerardine Mukeshimana, Minister of Agriculture, Rwanda
  • Joseph Sam Sesay, Minister of Agriculture, Sierra Leone

The 2014 Borlaug Dialogue is an international symposium that brings together in Des Moines, Iowa, agricultural leaders from around the world. This year, the Dialogue is addressing, The Greatest Challenge in Human History: Can We Sustainably Feed the 9 Billion People on Our Planet by Year 2050? Video recordings from the proceedings will be available on The World Food Prize soon.

Agriculture Productivity Not Accelerating Fast Enough to Meet Demand in 2050

Global Harvest Initiative’s 2014 GAP Report® Highlights Obstacles to Meeting Needs of 9 Billion People in 2050

The Global Agricultural ImperativeIf the latest trend continues, the world may not be able to sustainably supply enough food and other agricultural goods to meet exponentially growing demand during the next three decades. Today, the Global Harvest Initiative (GHI) announced that stark reality as it released its fifth annual Global Agricultural Productivity Report® (GAP Report®) at the World Food Prize Symposium. The GAP Index™ is an annual snapshot of agricultural productivity growth measured against growth in global population and food demand. The report notes that for the first time in several years — global agricultural productivity is not accelerating fast enough to meet the expected agricultural demand by 2050 through sustainable practices. 

“This year’s report shows a clear gap that could dramatically impact people all around the globe,” said Dr. Margaret Zeigler, executive director of GHI. ”Raising productivity across all regions and for farmers of any size and scale requires long-term investments and sustained focus if we are going to have sufficient nutritious and affordable food and agriculture.” Zeigler continued, “To realize the promise of new global revolutions in agriculture, we need greater investment in agricultural research and development, better trade agreements for facilitation of global and regional trade in agriculture, and a commitment to apply information and science-based technologies. We must also promote the empowerment of women in society and in agricultural production, as their contributions will be key to lifting up the nutritional status of the next generation.”

The Global Harvest Initiative (GHI) is a private-sector voice for productivity growth throughout the agricultural value chain to sustainably meet the demands of a growing world. Since its establishment in 2009, GHI has been focused on the importance of agricultural productivity for global food security, and since 2010, GHI has released its signature GAP Report®, an annual benchmark of the global rate of agricultural productivity. DuPont Pioneer is a supporting member of GHI.

Find the complete GAP Report® here.

 

Taking on the Challenge of Food Security – the Youth Factor

Food and Agricultural Careers Await Young People

A new report released today identifies a growing gap between the supply of new graduates trained in agriculture-related STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields and the demand for young professionals in related roles by global food and agriculture employers. The report recommends that the food and agriculture industries work closely with educational institutions on closing the employment gap necessary to sustainably feed an expected global population of nine billion people by 2050.

STEM_agcareer_DataThe STEM Food & Ag Council, a project of STEMconnector®, found substantial career opportunities in the food and agriculture industries for the next generation of young people and calls on Millennials to pursue STEM education. Key findings from the report include:

  • From January to August 2014, the food and agriculture industries hired nearly 34,000 people per month.
  • A quarter of current food and agriculture professionals are age 55 or older, meaning that workforce attrition will create additional opportunities for young professionals to advance in their careers.
  • A 4.9 percent aggregate growth in STEM employment opportunities in advanced agriculture fields is projected over the next five years, adding 33,100 new positions.

Find the full STEMconnector® report and recommendations online at stemconnector.org.

Global Youth Institute

This week, The World Food Prize are hosting youth from around the world at its Global Youth Institute in Des Moines, Iowa. The institute allows more than 100 high school students and their mentor to interact with Nobel and World Food Prize Laureates and discuss food security and agricultural issues with international experts. World Food Prize Foundation President, Ambassador Kenneth Quinn, penned an OpEd about the three-day experience for the Des Moines Register, here.

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